2016 PRESERVE JAZZ

The 2016 Preserve Jazz Festival is back and better than ever!  The Over the Mountain Festival will be held at the Preserve once again!  Back to its roots, the Jazz Festival this September 17, 2016 promises to be GREAT TIMES WITH GREAT JAZZ!

Where does the money go?

All festival proceeds (after the bills are paid) will be donated to two worthy, local causes at Samford University:

Help support a deserving college student pursue their dream of majoring in music and the only jazz radio station in the Birmingham metro area…  Just our way of giving back to the community…

Amazing Artists

All Jazz | All Weekend

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Preserve Jazz Festival

Jazz Fusion

Jazz fusion, which developed in the late 1960s and became a dominant style in the 1970s, represented an attempt to synthesize the improvisational elements of jazz with the simplified rhythms and electronic instruments of blues and rock music. Miles Davis initiated the movement with his 1969 album ``In a Silent Way.`` Artists known primarily for playing jazz fusion include Weather Report, Chick Corea, and Nucleus.

New Orleans Jazz

New Orleans jazz, which drew upon elements of dixieland, started in its namesake city in about 1910 and soon was spread to Chicago, New York, and other urban areas by touring bands. It combined trumpet or clarinet improvisation over a backing band consisting usually of piano, banjo, drums, and double bass or tuba. Perhaps the most famous New Orleans jazz tune is ``When the Saints Go Marching In,`` and the most celebrated performers associated with this style include King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton, Sidney Bechet, and, above all, Louis Armstrong.

Smooth Jazz

Developed during the 1980s, smooth jazz added a lounge element to jazz. It focused on producing down-tempo songs characterized by electric bass guitar, saxophone, and programmed percussion. The sound, heavily influenced by pop music styles, was clean and commercial and aimed for a polished, easy-listening finish, far from the frenetic outbursts and difficulties of bebop and free jazz. George Benson, Earl Klugh, David Sanborn, and Dave Koz are amongst the genre's most well-known practitioners.